Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, Director of the Center for Applied Genomics, explains that genetic testing can now be used to predict responses to certain medications. This will help to prevent negative reactions and improve healthcare.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that the eMERGE consortium in a collaborative network of 10 medical centers, working to use genomic information to improve healthcare. Dr. Hakonarson directs CHOPs involvement in the program, and aims to use genetic information from 60,000 children to help identify the best treatments for patients at CHOP.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that people can response very differently to pain medications. For morphine and other analgesics, some individuals may require a 10-fold increase in dosage. Genetic testing can help determine the dosage of morphine a person should receive. In turn, this will result in improved healthcare.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that genetic testing can now be used to predict responses to asthma medications - helping to decide what medication will help a patient the most, what dose should work best, and what medications to avoid.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that genetic testing can now be used to predict responses to certain medications - including Prilosec/omeprazole. Omeprazole (also known as Prilosec) is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We can now test for genetic variations in two genes - called CYP2D6 and CYP2C19. Test results can help decide the appropriate medication/dosage.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that genetic testing can now be used to predict responses to cancer medications - including those used to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and others. These cancers are often treated with thiopruines. However, certain individuals have a genetic difference in a gene called TPMT, which means their body has problems processing the drug. For these people, the drug can accumulate in the body, and become toxic. Genetic testing allows us to identify these people prior to treatment, and therefore avoid this potentially negative reaction.

CAG Director, Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, explains that extremely stringent measures are taken to protect patient privacy in genetic research studies at CHOP and elsewhere. It is critically important to ensure the risk to patients is minimal.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, Director of the Center for Applied Genomics, explains that the new Joint Genome Center at CHOP brings together the largest pediatric biobank in the world, with BGI's capabilities and expertise in whole-genome sequencing and analysis.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson, Director of the Center for Applied Genomics, explains that the Center was established to explore the genetic causes of common childhood disease.

Dr. Wayne Wei Liu, co-Director of the Joint Genome Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, explains the implications of bringing BGI's whole-genome sequencing expertise to a new partnership with CHOP, opening doors for speeding science from the lab, into the hands of clinicians, to improve patient outcomes in a faster, more affordable manner.

CAG Director, Hakon Hakonarson, discusses state-of-the-art technology being used to conduct large-scale human genome sequencing at the newly-formed Joint Genome Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a partnership between CHOP and BGI

Dr. Struan Grant, Associate Director at the Center for Applied Genomics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, discusses his research into the genetic basis of childhood diseases, including osteoporosis, and diabetes.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's commitment to identify genes associated with childhood disease. The ultimate goal is to aid development of pharmaceutical products for treating these diseases.

Rosetta Chiavacci, Clinical Research Manager at the Center for Applied Genomics, leads the Center's efforts to collect DNA from 100,000 individuals in an effort to tackle common pediatric diseases.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's major effort to understand the genetics of autism, including a number of high-profile studies that have identified candidate genes.

Dr.Brendan Keating, Lead Clinical Data Analyst at the Center for Applied Genomics, discusses how the Center uses genome-wide association studies to identify genes involved in childhood disease.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's recent discovery of genetic variants associated with ADHD.

Dr. Patrick Sleiman, Research Fellow at the Center for Applied Genomics, discusses the Center's role in uncovering a major candidate gene for asthma. Additionally, Dr. Sleiman discusses the role of copy number variants (CNVs) in childhood disease.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's research into the genetic causes of childhood schizophrenia.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's commitment to understanding common pediatric diseases , which are typically highly complex and involve many genes.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses recent research at the Center identifying genetic causes of type 1 diabetes. Researchers are the Center discovered a number of genes, including KIAA0350, which is primarily expresses in cells that affect insulin production.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's recent discovery of a number of genes that predispose to Crohn's disease.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's recent discovery of a genetic mutation that may predict how children with neuroblastoma respond to treatment.

Jennifer LeBold, Senior Resource Coordinator at the Center for Applied Genomics, introduces the Center and explains how to get in touch.

Dr. John Connolly discusses the GO Neurodevelopment Project - a collaborative study conducted by the Center for Applied Genomics and the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Marina Bakay joined the Center for Applied Genomics to examine the role of the C-type lectin gene as a cause of type 1 diabetes.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's capacity as the largest pediatric genotyping facility in the world. The wealth of genomic and clinical data collected at CAG has enabled the Center to pioneer major discoveries of the causes of diseases including ADHD, asthma, autism, cancer, diabetes, and schizophrenia.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson discusses the Center's recent developments in identifying the genetic causes of epilepsy.

Dr. Hakon Hakonarson talks to WHYY about the genetics of autism