Brendan Keating, Ph.D.

Brendan Keating is lead clinical data analyst at the Center for Applied Genomics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and is a faculty member of the Departments of Pediatrics and Surgery (Division of Transplantation) at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Keating previously held biotech research positions at Cambridge NeuroScience, Cambridge, MA, and Genaissance, New Haven, CT. He received his D.Phil. (Ph.D.) in molecular genetics from Christ Church College and the Department of Clinical Medicine at University of Oxford, with labwork completed in the Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics facility in the Churchill Hospital. His thesis involved in vivo assessment of promoter SNPs within evoked inflammatory models. He completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute of Translational Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he designed and developed large-scale SNP panels for cardiovascular-related studies which have resulted in a large number of CVD-related genetic discoveries. He is involved in a number of large-scale genomics projects across a spectrum of cardiovascular and metabolic traits through a number of US and European consortia. Dr. Keating's other research interests focus on the analyses of donor and recipients genomes in heart, liver, lung and kidney transplantation, with the aim of delivering individualized treatment of immunosuppression therapies post-transplant, and prediction of genetic signals that may underpin graft rejection and complications of rejection such as new onset of diabetes after transplantation (NODAT).

Dr. Keating is a member of the pharmacogenetics and return of results (RoR) working groups of the NIH sponsored electronic medical record and genomics (eMERGE) network. Dr. Keating is Principal Investigator of the genome-wide studies of all accessible donor-recipient solid-organ transplant samples within the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Keating mentors two post-doctoral fellows, one MD/PhD student, an analyst and one programmer.