CHOP Research Institute

Center for Applied Genomics

Today's Research Becomes Tomorrows Cure

Major variations in the number of genes carried in a person's genome have been linked with schizophrenia, in a study that provides further evidence of the important role played by genetics in raising the risk of the illness, which affects one in 100 people.
Article by: The Independent (UK); May 11, 2010
 

Pediatric researchers analyzing DNA variations in type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease have found a complex interplay of genes. Some genes have opposing effects, raising the risk of one disease while protecting against the other. In other cases, a gene variant may act in the same direction, raising the risk for both diseases.
Article by: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; March 22, 2010
 

Pediatrics researchers have identified the first major gene location responsible for a severe, often painful type of food allergy called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this disease, which may cause weight loss, vomiting, heartburn and swallowing difficulties, a patient may be unable to eat a wide variety of foods.
Article by: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; March 08, 2010
 

The genetic underpinnings of many diseases remain elusive, and computer simulations and experimental data suggest a reason why: the true culprit may be masked by a more obvious suspect.
Article by: Nature News; January 26, 2010